Sunday, September 9, 2012

The ugly

One of the things I try hard to do is share the fuckups, disappointments, accidents, etc. in my horse life. When my shit goes wrong and I think "god maybe I shouldn't blog this," that's when I make sure to blog it. So, first, please click through (if you're looking at this in Reader) and watch this video.


Dixie trotting, Sept 2012 from Funder on Vimeo.

Man, that is a fine moving horse. Unfortunately she's, like, the polar opposite of how a gaited horse should move! No flashy high action, just a real businesslike smooth easy trot. So already I'm kinda cringing - look, look at my amazing TWH endurance horse's super efficient trot. You're doin' it wrong, Funder.

(She's still so skinny. Gotta get those ribs covered - but it's only been a week of the Fat Camp plan.)

So I've watched the clip over and over, in slow motion even, and that mare is absolutely landing flat/heel-first. She's not toeing it at all. She's just flowing along perfectly.

And look at this hoof! It's a little long, yeah, and a little underrun at the heels, but that's a fine looking hoof.
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Earlier this week, Tuesday or Wednesday, I checked on Miss D and that sole was looking like it was maybe ready to come out. Then I was laid very low indeed by some minor food poisoning and I wasn't able to get back out til this weekend. On Saturday I arose from my deathbed and went and shot that video - plus picked up Dixie's feet and had a look-see.

The packed-in sole was definitely ready to come out, and her frogs were absolutely eaten up by thrush. I don't know how much you can see from these shots, but here goes...

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That was midway through the prying session. I got some more sole and bar out of all four feet, but I only took those shots. Then I scrubbed purple thrush stuff all up in her feet. This is a terrible photograph, but I think you can see how deep the crevices are.

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Today I went back and packed those crevices with tea tree oil gauze.

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Now that the sole is coming out, her heels are hugely long.

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This is the bit where you might disagree with me: I'm leaving the walls alone for a couple days. My first instinct was to scrape out the crumbly sole, treat the thrush, and trim to live sole as normal, but I'm going to wait. I kinda think that the walls are protecting her poor frogs. I know they need to get back to ground contact and start doing their job, but I also think it's a good idea to let them heal up for a short time first.

Also, I think that my horse has no nerves in her feet or something.

***

You remember my sweet tack trunk I made out of a vertical tool chest from Home Depot? Yeah, it didn't work out so well. I mean, it worked fine on perfectly flat indoor surfaces, but it was almost impossible to accordion open the chest on bumpy outdoor ground. It's been demoted to living in the garage holding "stuff I might one day need," and I'm trying something new for in-trailer storage.

It's another tool chest from Home Depot - this one is like a trunk, with a telescoping handle, wheels, and a lift-off lid. Fits in the back under the saddle rack.
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Holds the "I might need this on the road" stuff.
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BIG removable top tray comfortably holds all my trimming junk.
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Mr. September's a big handsome fellow, but his human appears to have misplaced his clothes!
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And finally, I stole a couple of Tahoe Rim ribbons ;)
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11 comments:

  1. I think I would do the same with leaving the walls for a couple of days. The benefits of letting the frog toughen a little before being put back into action out weighs the possible separation that would occur IMO.

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  2. well, my fox trotter run walks and hard trots. Does that make you feel any better? He actually moves out at a hard trot a lot like her while at freedom and run walks when you ride him. Its angles and making them collect up and work, bleh. this coming from someone who showed fox trotters for years. I'm more into my comfort trail riding and less about performance. I even sent one fox trotter into retirement and got a thouroughbred

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  3. Oh, your calendar, so yummy, lovely...horse...an update each month would be good on this blog...

    And the thrush, not great, Dixie sure moves out nicely though! Stoic horses are tough. Have you tried soaking? Major used to have more of a problem with it (increased his minerals has helped) but soaking with white lightning (or Oxine, which I found easier) can really knock the thrush out to start healing. I tried tea tea, Pete's goo, multiple things. I do like the dry no thrush powder before things get too ratty.

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  4. That is a splendid *endurance* trot, no matter what breed of horse we're talking about. Nice, easy motion, lots of good shoulder + rear engine.

    Feet: that purple stuff is awesome. It will get her fixed up in no time, then you can worry about the rest of it.

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  5. Thats a really flowing trot!! Reminds me of my other horse, just like a floating feather! She`s good, nice action. The feet? well I`ve seen worse, but your doing the right thing there, leave the walls for a little while, then trim.

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  6. Now that Dixie is in a "stall", is there any chance of putting some pea gravel in her run area? That might help stimulate the frog and sole, work out the false sole naturally and help build up the frog. It's pretty cheap to purchase ($30 or so for a cubic yard?) which will cover about 10x10 area 3 inches deep or so.

    PS. Love your calendar. ;)

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  7. THIEF!!!!! ;) I think we also traded manure forks. Or at least, I *hope* you have my light blue one, because I have a new-to-me green one now. LOL

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  8. in this post I couldn't get past Mr September....
    - The Equestrian Vagabond

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  9. I love mr. september! Got to get me one of those calendars for my trailer. I too did a bit of creative organization with my trailer that I need to take pictures of and post. This reminded me.

    I agree with leaving the walls. My current trimmer is in favor of doing things a little slower than I have in the past - not taking the heels down and walls etc as much as I have seen recommended, instead he bevels and rounds edges that need to come down and lets the horse wear them down on their own. I was skeptical at first, BUT it has worked and now Farley maintains her feet on her own without me continually having to take heel and wall off so I'm a believer in taking some time with the foot and taking off a little bit at a time mroe often, than necessarily getting it picture perfect --> even if I *could* and not make my horse sore. I'm finding out, like most things in teh horse world, I get there faster by going slower.

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  10. Why can't I subscribe to comments :(

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  11. Dixie looks great in the video!

    I did an interim trim on Val a few weeks ago. Used the knife on the bars, orked on the flares with the rasp, still get nervous when I pick the nippers up.

    I also found Mr. September noteworthy...

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